FintekNews Celebrates #WomenInFintech – Meet Grace Rachmany of Dao Leadership

We’re pleased to present our latest installment in our feature series – “FintekNews Celebrates #WomenInFintech“.  This week, we’d like to introduce you to Grace Rachmany, CEO & Co-Founder of DAO Leadership and IWriteICOwhitepapers.com.  Her companies provide whitepaper writing services as well as strategic and tokenomics consulting for blockchain organizations.


NAME:  Grace (Rebecca) Rachmany
TITLE: CEO, Co-Founder
COMPANY: IwriteICOwhitepapers.com, DAO Leadership
WEB ADDRESS: www.IwriteICOwhitepapers.com, www.DAOleadership.com

1) What does your financial technology firm offer?

Not surprisingly, IwriteICOwhitepapers.com provides whitepaper writing. Actually, most of our clients come to us for the strategy and business consulting we provide during the process of writing an ICO whitepaper. The whitepaper isn’t just important because other people read it; it’s important because it represents a full strategic thinking process around what your company does.

2) What was the personal motivation for you to launch your firm?  

I had two motivators. Firstly, I needed a quick way to make money while supporting my digital nomad lifestyle. Secondly, I had an idea for an ICO and I wanted to learn as much as I could as fast as I could about the industry.

3) As a female entrepreneur, do you feel any advantages/disdvantages in being female as you are seeking capital to grow & building your business? 

The blockchain industry is generally insensitive to labels on people, but it’s a bit of an advantage to be female when it comes to being memorable. There aren’t many women, and there even fewer women my age, so I stand out in a crowd. Also, if people are looking for conference speakers or people to put on their advisory boards, they want to have female representation, so it’s also an advantage from that perspective.

4) Do you feel you are at a competitive advantage – or disadvantage – as a female fintech entrepreneur – or neither?

I keep looking at these questions and saying to myself “Fintech? I’m not in fintech!” In other words, even I myself have a predjudice against the idea that I’m a woman in fintech. I have a math degree and an MBA and I still feel a bit apprehensive about numbers. I advise people on tokenomics and I have a very strong grasp of economics and mathematics, yet my confidence isn’t as high as a lot of men who may or may not have as deep a conceptual background as I do.

5)  Do you feel there are more women starting financial technology companies than in other business sectors?  If so, why or why not?

It depends. I see a lot of women of Asian descent opening financial technology companies, but not from other cultures. Generally speaking, I don’t see a representative percentage of women gravitating to this sector. In my opinion, this all has to do with our perceptions as children. People set their expectations in life before age 10. That’s when people ask us “what will you be when you grow up?” If you look at the media, toys and role models that girls are exposed to, it becomes obvious that very few little girls imagine themselves as financial moguls. If you don’t set a goal to become something, you simply won’t become it. By the way, that’s why I founded my previous company, Gangly Sister. We created comic books and videos that have girls in entrepreneurship and technology roles. It’s really too late by the time a person gets to college, because by then we already have our blueprint of what our life is supposed to be like.

6) Do you think the trend will continue where we will see more women in leadership roles in fintechs (Yes/No) and why? 

I think we are doing a better job of exposing young people to a wider variety of careers and more varied nuances of gender roles. From that perspective, I think yes. I remember taking my daughter to some work meetings when she was around 12 years old, and on our way home  she said to me, “So, you don’t have to be a programmer or engineer in order to be an entrepreneur, right?” As more girls realize they don’t have to be socially inept to become a fintech entrepreneur, we’ll see more women being attracted to the field.


Grace (Rebecca) Rachmany has been an entrepreneur, leader, and mentor in the technology business for more than 25 years. She is the founder of IwriteICOwhitepapers.com and DAO Leadership, and the co-author of “So, You’ve Got a DAO… Handbook for Distributed and Connected Leadership 1.0.”